NEW RELEASE: Be Still My Soul

We are happy to announce that our newest book – Be Still My Soul: A Collection of Essays about Finding Hope and Encouragement in the Face of Suffering and Trials by Luci Partain – is now available!

Be Still My Soul (cover)Download a sample of the book!

After facing a difficult year and an uncertain future, there is a dire need for hope and encouragement in order to face the challenges before us. Of course, Christians have hope beyond this life; yet the more difficult our circumstances are, the easier it is to become distracted from this hope and discouraged by what is going on around us.

In this book, sister Luci Partain has produced a series of essays that will help us find the encouragement we need in order to face the trials before us. Despite what we might suffer in this life, there is hope if we will remain faithful to God and keep focused on the goal of heaven.

Read more about this new book and purchase your copy today!

If you would like to place a bulk order, please contact us.

Special Offer

For a limited time, save over 25% off this book when you place an order through the Gospel Armory Store!

NOTE: Pre-orders have been sent out. Any new orders will be sent out as soon as possible. However, due to slower than normal shipping times, we cannot guarantee that any new orders will arrive before Christmas.

PRE-ORDER: Be Still My Soul

We are happy to announce that our newest book – Be Still My Soul: A Collection of Essays about Finding Hope and Encouragement in the Face of Suffering and Trials by Luci Partain – is now available for pre-order!

Be Still My Soul (cover)After facing a difficult year and an uncertain future, there is a dire need for hope and encouragement in order to face the challenges before us. Of course, Christians have hope beyond this life; yet the more difficult our circumstances are, the easier it is to become distracted from this hope and discouraged by what is going on around us.

In this book, sister Luci Partain has produced a series of essays that will help us find the encouragement we need in order to face the trials before us. Despite what we might suffer in this life, there is hope if we will remain faithful to God and keep focused on the goal of heaven.

The book contains the following essays:

  1. Does Jesus Care?
  2. Be Still My Soul: Embracing God’s Provision in Our Trials
  3. Though He Slay Me
  4. Wait for the Lord!
  5. Jehovah God, Shine Forth!
  6. Lamentations: Grief, Comfort, and Hope
  7. Great Is Thy Faithfulness
  8. Soaring Like Eagles to the Heights of God
  9. Habakkuk: In God’s Providential Hands
  10. Praying At All Times
  11. Overcoming Evil with Good
  12. Overcoming Discouragement and Disappointment
  13. Called to Thankfulness
  14. Are You an Unhappy Child of God?
  15. Do Not Be Anxious About Anything
  16. But One Thing I Do! Pressing Onward
  17. Will Your Anchor Hold in the Storms of Life?
  18. It Is Well With My Soul
  19. Be Ye Steadfast and Immovable
  20. This World Is Not My Home
  21. The Bible Doctrine of Heaven
  22. There Is a Habitation
  23. Walking by Faith, Not by Sight
  24. God Amid the Storm

There is a special discount for pre-orders of 27% off the regular price!

Read more about these new books and pre-order your copies today!

NOTE: This book is available now for pre-order. All orders will be shipped once the books arrive from the printer (scheduled for mid-December).

Being Hardworking vs. Being Too Busy

Social Issues

God’s people are to be hardworking/industrious – The wise man wrote, “Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might…” (Ecclesiastes 9:10). Because of the uncertain nature of life, he later spoke of the need work “in the morning” and “not be idle in the evening” (Ecclesiastes 11:6). The apostle Paul said that Christians are to “work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men” (Colossians 3:23). Even those without an employer – such as housewives – were to be known for their hard work (1 Timothy 5:13-14).

We are also to make time for what is important – We are not to “[forsake] our own assembling together, as is the habit of some” (Hebrews 10:25). We are to make time for Bible study (2 Timothy 2:15) and prayer (1 Thessalonians 5:17). We also have responsibilities as spouses, parents, and children that require our time (Ephesians 5:22-6:4).

If we are too busy, we can fail to make time for God or spiritual things – In the parable of the sower, Jesus warned that the “worries and riches and pleasures of this life” can choke out the word and leave one unfruitful (Luke 8:14). He later described a rich land owner who lost his soul because he was too busy with earthly labors to focus on spiritual things (Luke 12:16-21). Felix listened to Paul’s preaching but dismissed him until he could “find time” to consider it further (Acts 24:25). We need to make the most of our time, but being too busy to think about spiritual things is not a wise use of it.


The above post is an excerpt from the book, Social Issues: Learning about and Dealing with the Problems of the Present Age by Andy Sochor. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!

Basic Bible Principles Related to Racism

Social Issues

All men are made in the image of God – When God created man in the beginning, He said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness… God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them” (Genesis 1:26-27). However, this did not apply only to the first man and woman (Adam and Eve); this applies to all men since that time, even today (cf. Genesis 9:6; James 3:9).

All men descended from one man – When Paul was speaking with the Greek philosophers on Mars Hill, he told them about the “unknown God” (Acts 17:23) – the true, living God of heaven. He explained that God “made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth” (Acts 17:26). Since everyone came “from one man” (Adam), the different races and tribes of the earth did not evolve in different ways from lower life forms. That means that all people – regardless of race, ethnicity, etc. – are inherently equal.

All are one in Christ and Jesus died for all – Not only are all inherently equal by virtue of the fact that they were made in God’s image, there is also equality with regard to their spiritual identity as the people of God in Christ. Paul wrote, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). Just as Jews and Greeks (Gentiles) could be one in Christ, people everywhere can be one in Him today as well. Jesus was sent to die on the cross because “God so loved the world” (John 3:16), not just a certain race.

God does not show partiality – When Peter came to the household of Cornelius (a Gentile), the gospel had not yet been preached to the Gentiles. Yet through the events described in that chapter, Peter came to understand that “God is not one to show partiality, but in every nation the man who fears Him and does what is right is welcome to Him” (Acts 10:34-35). God was willing to accept all people if they would fear and obey Him.

We are to show love for all men – As God shows no partiality, we must also show no partiality (James 2:1, 9). Therefore, Paul told the brethren in Thessalonica that they were to “increase and abound in love for one another, and for all people” (1 Thessalonians 3:12). Just as no one is excluded from the love of God, we are to show love for all men, regardless of race or ethnicity.


The above post is an excerpt from the book, Social Issues: Learning about and Dealing with the Problems of the Present Age by Andy Sochor. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!

Peace, Peace, Quiet Peace

The Good Church At Philippi

“Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus” (Phil. 4:6-7).

Paul wrote in this letter to the good church at Philippi several times about joy. A sure thing that will deprive a Christian of the joy Paul speaks of is anxiety. Yet there is an antidote for anxiety—prayer.

Yes, any number of situations may arise to give us anxious moments. During these situations we could spend our time “stewing” over the problems. What would be gained in such activity? Perhaps we should pause and reflect that the “stewing” time could be time spent in prayer over the same situations.

One thing needs to be said here. Paul is not saying that a Christian should care for nothing. There certainly are legitimate concerns in life, but even legitimate concerns can be elevated into major distractions. A careful reading of Matthew 6:25-33 will reveal this very point. God knows we have need of these things, but we cannot let them have control of our lives. Let us not be consumed with these things, we have help in an ally of whom it is said that we should be found “…casting all your care upon Him, for He cares for you” (1 Peter 5:7). When this is done, a great burden is lifted and the Christian can have peace, peace, quiet peace. What peace it is that comes from knowing that we have such an ally in a caring God.

Sometimes the word peace is used in connection with reconciliation (Rom. 5:1; etc.). Surely it includes that here AND also includes the comfort that comes from trusting in God. One said, “…the deep tranquility of a soul resting wholly upon God—the antithesis to the solicitude and anxiety engendered by the world and worldliness” (Elicit, p. 102-103).

The phrase “…passeth (surpasses, NKJV) all understanding…” is intriguing. We struggle with the meaning of it and acknowledge difficulty in doing so. When this peace is possessed, it shows immediately in those who have it. They are a calm in the midst of a storm, a source of amazement to others. “Doesn’t this bother you,” some might shout out. Of course it does, but they are handling it through prayer and trust in God. We understand the principle involved, but marvel at the result. Words escape us in our attempts to explain the state of such peace, peace, quiet peace. “The peace of God not only suffices to relieve anxiety, but surpasses or transcends human comprehen-sion” (Weaver, p. 219).

We are bombarded with advice on coping with stress. Books, tapes, seminars, et cetera are advertised and published with the purpose of alleviating stress in one’s life. I suppose millions of dollars are spent each year (maybe each month) on stress management. Though they may do some minimal and temporary good, they do not compare to the peace that is described in these verses. What you find here is real stress management.


The above post is an excerpt from the book, The Good Church At Philippi by Terry Sanders. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!