The Fiendish Deeds of Alcohol

Rum and Ruin: A Collection of Writings on the Issue of Alcohol

by L. F. Bittle (1833-1905)

There guarded by our license laws,
With Appetite to plead his cause,
The Alcoholic Demon reigns,
And in his retinue retains.

The hydra dire of vice and crime,
And, with an imprudence malign,
Enthrones himself in church and state,
And rules the little and the great.

Untrammeled in his evil ways,
Upon the nation’s life he preys,
Degrades the lofty, stains the pure,
And robs the wealthy and the poor.

Arouses hatred, kindles strife,
And makes the land with murder rife,
Each pauper house and prison fills,
The innocent assails and kills,
Breaks woman’s heart with purpose fell,
And dooms his devotees to hell!

His horrors our official view,
And all permit for revenue,—
Permit, encourage, sanction all,
The fiendish deeds of Alcohol,
That they may fill the public purse,
With taxes from a nation’s curse.


The above post is an excerpt from the book, Rum and Ruin: A Collection of Writings on the Issue of Alcohol. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!

Timothy and Wine

Rum and Ruin: A Collection of Writings on the Issue of Alcohol

by David Lipscomb (1831-1917)

Brother Lipscomb: Please explain 1 Timothy 5:23, which reads thus: “Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach’s sake and thine often infirmities.”

Timothy did not drink wine. That is clear. He refrained from it, doubtless, because it was regarded by the Holy Spirit as incompatible with the Christian character. The curse of God was upon it and all who “look upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his color in the cup, when it moveth itself aright. At the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.”

Timothy knew the evil as condemned in the Scriptures, which he had known from a child, and refrained from the use of it, confining himself to the use of water. He was often afflicted. His stomach was disordered. Yet such an evil he recognized the use of wine to be he suffered rather than countenance its use by Christians. Paul wrote to him: “Drink no long water [alone], but use a little wine for thy stomach’s sake and thine often infirmities.” Paul thought he might use it for the curing of his disordered stomach and to relieve his frequent sickness; but, then, he was to be cautious to use only a little.

It shows plainly in what esteem the inspired men held the use of wine. It could be used only in cases of sickness, and then only in small quantities. No Christian ought ever to think of touching it under other conditions.


The above post is an excerpt from the book, Rum and Ruin: A Collection of Writings on the Issue of Alcohol. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!

NEW RELEASE: Rum and Ruin: A Collection

We would like to announce our newest title – Rum and Ruin: A Collection of Writings on the Issue of Alcohol – is now available.

Rum and Ruin (cover) This volume is a collection of writings by preachers associated with the Restoration Movement as they addressed the issue of alcohol. It includes the following:

  • A book by D. R. Dungan (Rum and Ruin: The Remedy Found)
  • Shorter articles by Pardee Butler, David Lipscomb, and Benjamin Franklin
  • Biographical excerpts about Robert Milligan and Knowles Shaw
  • A story by V. M. Metcalfe
  • A poem by L. F. Bittle

This material provides us with a glimpse into how preachers dealt with this issue in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It contains helpful instructions and reminders for us today.

Download a sample of the book!

Read more about the book and purchase your copy today!

Special Offer

Now through the end of the year, save $2 off this book when you place an order through the Gospel Armory Store and use coupon code Rum2 at checkout. Hurry, this offer is good through December 31, 2019.


This is the seventeenth release in our Ancient Landmarks Collection. This collection is made up of materials that have been produced by those associated with the Restoration Movement. More titles will be added to this collection in the future. Be sure to subscribe to our mailing list to be notified of new releases.

Do Not Look On The Wine When It Is Red (Notes on Proverbs)

My Son, Hear My Words: Notes on Proverbs

The following is an excerpt from the book, My Son, Hear My Words: Notes on Proverbs.

Do not look on the wine when it is red, when it sparkles in the cup, when it goes down smoothly; at the last it bites like a serpent and stings like a viper” (23:31-32). Those who believe that the casual use of alcohol (“social drinking”) is acceptable, just so long as one does not proceed to drunkenness, need to remember this verse. Rather than advising one to enjoy alcohol in moderation, Solomon warns that one should not even look at it! Though it may go down smoothly, it will cause trouble for the one who consumes it. Far from condoning the drinking of alcohol in moderation, Solomon instead warns that one should not even look at it, lest he be tempted to take the first drink.

You can read more comments on the book of Proverbs in My Son, Hear My Words: Notes on Proverbs. Follow the link to learn more about the book and purchase your copy today!